thescienceofillustration:

Wooden wheel hub by BlackPariahDog

Did this for my archaeological illustration module in grad school.

thescienceofillustration:

Wooden wheel hub by BlackPariahDog

Did this for my archaeological illustration module in grad school.

biomedical-visuals:

I recently participated in CGSociety and the Idaho Visualization Lab’s Minitexture challenege. The Idaho Visualization lab provided models they have created as reconstructions of the now extinct Helicoprion and their prey the Nautiloid. Our job was to take the models, texture them and throw them in a scene together. Here is my final beauty render of the two, but if you’d like to see details of the textures, please visit my CGPortfolio here.

You can also view the other entries, including the entries from my friend and fellow classmate Caitlin Johnston, here.

This was a really fun texture excersize, and I learned a lot about ZBrush just by participating.

biomedical-visuals:

I recently participated in CGSociety and the Idaho Visualization Lab’s Minitexture challenege. The Idaho Visualization lab provided models they have created as reconstructions of the now extinct Helicoprion and their prey the Nautiloid. Our job was to take the models, texture them and throw them in a scene together. Here is my final beauty render of the two, but if you’d like to see details of the textures, please visit my CGPortfolio here.

You can also view the other entries, including the entries from my friend and fellow classmate Caitlin Johnston, here.

This was a really fun texture excersize, and I learned a lot about ZBrush just by participating.

scienceyoucanlove:

Beautifully detailed anatomical drawing by Leonardi da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci was an all around genius.He was a painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. His genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal.
Leonardo has often been described as the archetype of the Renaissance Man, a man of “unquenchable curiosity” and “feverishly inventive imagination”. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived
Leonardo’s anatomical drawings include many studies of the human skeleton and its parts, and studies muscles and sinews. He studied the mechanical functions of the skeleton and the muscular forces that are applied to it in a manner that prefigured the modern science of biomechanics.
He drew the heart and vascular system, the sex organs and other internal organs, making one of the first scientific drawings of a fetus in utero. The drawings and notation are far ahead of their time, and if published, would undoubtedly have made a major contribution to medical science.
Find more of da Vinci’s awesome drawings here:http://http://ift.tt/PQdzjZ

text source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Beautifully detailed anatomical drawing by Leonardi da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci was an all around genius.He was a painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. His genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal.
Leonardo has often been described as the archetype of the Renaissance Man, a man of “unquenchable curiosity” and “feverishly inventive imagination”. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived
Leonardo’s anatomical drawings include many studies of the human skeleton and its parts, and studies muscles and sinews. He studied the mechanical functions of the skeleton and the muscular forces that are applied to it in a manner that prefigured the modern science of biomechanics.
He drew the heart and vascular system, the sex organs and other internal organs, making one of the first scientific drawings of a fetus in utero. The drawings and notation are far ahead of their time, and if published, would undoubtedly have made a major contribution to medical science.
Find more of da Vinci’s awesome drawings here:http://http://ift.tt/PQdzjZ

text source 

ejlandsman:

Here’s my final for Vertebrate Illustration—a three-layer illustration of a cutting horse in action, and an informational poster about equine maneuverability in cattle cutting. The first piece, the whole horse with the cattle, is colored pencil on tinted illustration board; the skeleton, musculature, and hind leg diagram are all colored pencil on drafting film. For the full skeleton I painted the skeleton in on the wrong side of the film in white acrylic paint, so the pencil on the front would show up more strongly. Final poster in Photoshop.

ejlandsman:

Here’s my final for Vertebrate Illustration—a three-layer illustration of a cutting horse in action, and an informational poster about equine maneuverability in cattle cutting. The first piece, the whole horse with the cattle, is colored pencil on tinted illustration board; the skeleton, musculature, and hind leg diagram are all colored pencil on drafting film. For the full skeleton I painted the skeleton in on the wrong side of the film in white acrylic paint, so the pencil on the front would show up more strongly. Final poster in Photoshop.

unicolourtoads:

Hammerhead and hammers head. Tooth and nail.

unicolourtoads:

Hammerhead and hammers head. Tooth and nail.

kathrynpoole:

I did this stone all by myself and I didn’t mess it up I feel like such a responsible adult. I’m going to scan a print in a bit and then I’ll post that.

kathrynpoole:

I did this stone all by myself and I didn’t mess it up I feel like such a responsible adult. I’m going to scan a print in a bit and then I’ll post that.

sciencyartsythings:

For my BFA thesis, I’ve been Illustrating and writing a guide to aquatic invasive plants. My process for each illustration usually starts with an herbarium specimen. I don’t have access to living plants right now, so herbarium specimens are the next best thing.

An herbarium specimen is a dried pressed plant used as a historical account of what plants were growing where at what time and what they looked like. For my purposes, I am most interested in what the plants look like. I need to get a close look at all of the identifying characteristics.

First, I will leaf through (pun intended) all of the available specimens of a particular species. Sometimes there are a hundred or more specimens. This plant, Egeria densa, actually only had one specimen available at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, where I’ve been working on my thesis. After picking out specific specimens and deciding which pieces to draw from on each herbarium sheet, I sketch out the plant.

In this example, the herbarium specimen was covered in dirt and sand, which made it hard to see the details. While sketching, I mainly just wanted to figure out how many leafs were where and in what shape. I also may simplify the original plant specimen, cutting out extraneous details.

After the initial sketch to help me figure out what I’m looking at, I make a clean pencil line drawing. In this step, I reconstruct the plant, making it look more alive and fresh, instead of dead and dried up. I also add structural details, like a flower, that may have been missing in the specimen.

After I’m happy with the line drawing, I move to ink. I place the pencil line drawing under a sheet of vellum and ink the line work with a 005 micron. When the line work is done, I remove the pencil drawing from underneath the vellum and start stippling. The stipples build up value to show texture and light on form.

The ink drawing shown above is almost finished. I still have to add the flower! When it’s all done, I’ll scan it in, clean it up in photoshop and place it in the layout for the guide.

So that’s what I’ve been working on for the past few months! I have to draw 37 of these things all together. I have A LOT of work to do! Hopefully it all gets done by May 5!!

sciencyartsythings:

For my BFA thesis, I’ve been Illustrating and writing a guide to aquatic invasive plants. My process for each illustration usually starts with an herbarium specimen. I don’t have access to living plants right now, so herbarium specimens are the next best thing.

An herbarium specimen is a dried pressed plant used as a historical account of what plants were growing where at what time and what they looked like. For my purposes, I am most interested in what the plants look like. I need to get a close look at all of the identifying characteristics.

First, I will leaf through (pun intended) all of the available specimens of a particular species. Sometimes there are a hundred or more specimens. This plant, Egeria densa, actually only had one specimen available at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, where I’ve been working on my thesis. After picking out specific specimens and deciding which pieces to draw from on each herbarium sheet, I sketch out the plant.

In this example, the herbarium specimen was covered in dirt and sand, which made it hard to see the details. While sketching, I mainly just wanted to figure out how many leafs were where and in what shape. I also may simplify the original plant specimen, cutting out extraneous details.

After the initial sketch to help me figure out what I’m looking at, I make a clean pencil line drawing. In this step, I reconstruct the plant, making it look more alive and fresh, instead of dead and dried up. I also add structural details, like a flower, that may have been missing in the specimen.

After I’m happy with the line drawing, I move to ink. I place the pencil line drawing under a sheet of vellum and ink the line work with a 005 micron. When the line work is done, I remove the pencil drawing from underneath the vellum and start stippling. The stipples build up value to show texture and light on form.

The ink drawing shown above is almost finished. I still have to add the flower! When it’s all done, I’ll scan it in, clean it up in photoshop and place it in the layout for the guide.

So that’s what I’ve been working on for the past few months! I have to draw 37 of these things all together. I have A LOT of work to do! Hopefully it all gets done by May 5!!

wapiti3:

The Cactaceae : descriptions and illustrations of plants of the cactus family / by N.L. Britton and J.N. Rose. Published 1919 on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
BHL Collections:
New York Botanical Garden

wapiti3:

The Cactaceae : descriptions and illustrations of plants of the cactus family / by N.L. Britton and J.N. Rose. Published 1919 on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
BHL Collections:
New York Botanical Garden

holyshostakovich:

pen & ink drawing for a spot illustration assignment

I did the assignment twice :)

holyshostakovich:

pen & ink drawing for a spot illustration assignment

I did the assignment twice :)

rkherman:

A different take on the typical plant cell diagram. I decided to emphasize the vast quatities of organelles inside just one cell, as opposed to most diagrams that show and label 1-2 of each organelle.

rkherman:

A different take on the typical plant cell diagram. I decided to emphasize the vast quatities of organelles inside just one cell, as opposed to most diagrams that show and label 1-2 of each organelle.